Superman II Movie Minute #5 – Uncredited

SUPERMAN II MOVIE MINUTE #5 – Uncredited

Fire and Water Network All-Stars Chris Franklin and Rob Kelly bring you SUPERMAN II MOVIE MINUTE, where they analyze, scrutinize, and you’ll-believe-a-man-can-fly-ize the classic 1980 film starring Christopher Reeve, Gene Hackman, Margot Kidder, and Terence Stamp, five minutes at a time!

In minutes 21:00 – 25:00, Clark and Lois talk in her office, Lex Luthor and Otis talk in jail, and we learn the fate of Lex’s Liberace record.

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Opening theme and closing theme by John Williams
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10 responses to “Superman II Movie Minute #5 – Uncredited

  1. How can there be a ‘Twins of Evil’ mention without Chris yelling ‘Fire purifies!!”.

    I always found the juice gag too ridiculous. Like something out of a sitcom.

  2. Okay, here is how I take the liberace line. First off in 1978/80 liberace would have been the most unhip music you could listen to, just the type of music your villain would listen to. Also, remember Hackman dressed very flamboyant for 1978/80. This seems like like the type of Joke Tom Mankiewicz would have put in to show the Luthor was a very flamboyant character. Plus I can totally see Luthor making the moves on Ms Tessmacher to some Liberace!

  3. This snuck up on me. I wasn’t expecting the episode just yet…Why? I don’t know.

    My theory on why Lois smokes more in Superman 2….Product placement money from Marlboro. Look how many Marlboro signs show up during the fight in Metropolis. What better way for Marlboro to make smoking look glamorous than by showing the leading lady smoking. At least Salkind, Lester and company didn’t have Superman lighting up. Product placement was old hat by 1981, though. Have you ever noticed how many times someone drives past a Kentucky Fried Chicken in Goldfinger?

    Now that I’m older, I hate the scene of the cab running into Clark. The scene makes him look like he’s really clumsy and not just putting on an act. Otherwise, he is a jerk for endangering the life of someone, since ramming into Superman with a car could easily kill the driver.

    1. I completely agree. The point was for Clark to intentionally act clumsy to separate him from Superman. But getting hit by the cab and wreck it implies Superman himself is clumsy. That just ruins the point of his “Clark” persona. Even as Clark, he’s always in control, for example catching the bullet in Superman The Movie, not letting it ricochet randomly, and totally hiding what he’d done from Lois.

      When I was 12, the cab bit was funny. Now, no thanks.

      1. And wait until he falls into the fire on the honeymoon story. He didn’t do that on purpose. So was he really clumsy or just an act. Clark was better in 3 and 4. Too uneven in this one.

    2. This is an example of too many instances of movies adapting comic-book superheroes and getting them wrong and making the movie “too comic-book-y,” where it’s really making the property “too Hollywood-y.” In this case, the movie clumsily, and awkwardly, tries to do a humorous super-powers gag of the type that Cary Bates and Curt Swan would do every month. Bates and Swan knew Superman, and they knew Clark Kent. They could show Clark surreptitiously using his powers to 1.) avert an accident 2.) protect someone or 3.) justifiably embarrass Steve Lombard. The movies, not just this one, has the hero use his powers to do something sophomoric or overtly silly, at someone’s expense, for a cheap laugh. Maybe theses situations were found in some comic-books, like Gold Key or Harveys, but not in the super-hero comics I was reading at the time.
      These movies really could have benefited from Julius Schwartz.

  4. Sorry I’m late to the party on this one, but did Fred Wood actually say the line we heard? Or was it said by another actor in looping?

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